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Tasklist

FS#64070 - [grub] - please use proper English - "to set" wrong - "setting" correct

Attached to Project: Arch Linux
Opened by James (thx1138) - Wednesday, 09 October 2019, 15:36 GMT
Last edited by Christian Hesse (eworm) - Tuesday, 05 November 2019, 09:10 GMT
Task Type General Gripe
Category Packages: Core
Status Closed
Assigned To Christian Hesse (eworm)
Architecture All
Severity Very Low
Priority Low
Reported Version
Due in Version Undecided
Due Date Undecided
Percent Complete 100%
Votes 0
Private No

Details

grub 2:2.04-2

/etc/default/grub

I don't know what it is about "German English", but please use some version of "English English" in the Arch documents and files.

Wrong:

====
# Uncomment to make GRUB remember the last selection. This requires to
# set 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' above.
#GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT="true"
====

Please, just don't do that. This should instead be:

====
# Uncomment to make GRUB remember the last selection. This requires
# setting 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' above.
#GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT="true"
====

You can save the world from much "wincing", from something not entirely unlike the sound of fingernails scraping a chalk board, by using the English language properly.

Thanks
This task depends upon

Closed by  Christian Hesse (eworm)
Tuesday, 05 November 2019, 09:10 GMT
Reason for closing:  Fixed
Additional comments about closing:  grub 2:2.04-3
Comment by Eli Schwartz (eschwartz) - Thursday, 10 October 2019, 06:26 GMT
  • Field changed: Task Type (Bug Report → General Gripe)
  • Field changed: Category (Packages: Extra → Packages: Core)
  • Field changed: Severity (Low → Very Low)
  • Field changed: Priority (Normal → Low)
  • Task assigned to Christian Hesse (eworm)
The world isn't wincing, not even the portion of it that is based in the good old U.S. of A.

(Proof: I'm not wincing, because despite being from the USA I don't find this bothersome.)

...

Also just to be controversial I propose changing this to:

# Uncomment to make GRUB remember the last selection. This requires one to
# set 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' above.

Rationale: "setting" is inconsistent with "Uncomment", "preload", etc. so we don't want to change some German English to more German English.

We could even say:

# Uncomment to make GRUB remember the last selection. This depends on the
# 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' value above.
Comment by James (thx1138) - Thursday, 10 October 2019, 16:02 GMT
"You may uncomment this expression to make GRUB remember the last selection."

"this expression" is the object of the sentence, and the implicit topic of the statement.

"to make GRUB remember the last selection" is an adjectival phrase being applied to the object "this expression".


"This expression also requires you to set 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' above."

"This expression" is the subject of the sentence. "you" is the object of the sentence, but *not* the implicit topic of the statement.

"to set 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' above" is an adjectival phrase being applied to the object "you".


The object "you" is not material to the topic under discussion. Introducing the reader of the documentation, either as "you" or "one", as a direct topic of discussion only serves to obfuscate the actual topic, that of "setting 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' above".


Gerunds are verbals that end in -ing and function as nouns.
Participles are verbals that function as adjectives.


"This expression also requires setting 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' above."

"setting 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' above" is a noun phrase and the object of the verb "requires". "You" is not here introduced as a topic under discussion.


"Uncommenting the following expression will make GRUB remember the last selection, but only if 'GRUB_DEFAULT=saved' is also set, above."

"Uncommenting" is a gerund, and a noun, and the subject of the sentence, and the material topic under discussion.
Comment by James (thx1138) - Thursday, 10 October 2019, 16:46 GMT
"to set" is an infinitive.
"setting" is a gerund.

Some verbs take a gerund as an object. Other verbs take an infinitive as an object. Some verbs may take either a gerund or an infinitive, though the meaning will be subtly different in each case. There is no simple rule for this convention. Nonetheless, getting it wrong, is wrong. It is also annoying to English speakers.
Comment by Christian Hesse (eworm) - Monday, 28 October 2019, 18:42 GMT
Anybody wants to generate a proper patch for this?

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